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Regina tattoo artist talks 'ink' trends

Recent French study looked at perceptions of women with tatoos
Reported by Courtney Mintenko
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From poems on 16-year-old girls to skulls on “bad-ass bikers,” Tanielle Young sees a lot of variety in her tattoo parlour.

The Regina tattoo artist has been apprenticing at Planet Caravan Tattoos & Piercing for three years, and says there's not just one type of person who gets inked.

"Most of my repeat clients are guys, and most of the girls I tattoo just want to get something tiny," Young said.

Recently, French researchers took a look at how men perceive women who have tattoos, specifically a tattoo on their lower back often referred to as a "tramp stamp." The researchers had 11 women of "above-average attractiveness" on a beach lay face down on the sand wearing a bikini and reading a book.  For half of the visits the women made to the beach, they had a temporary tattoo on their lower back.

The study found more men approached the women when she had the tattoo than when she didn't.  Further, when the researchers spoke to the men about what they thought about the women, the men believed that the woman with a tattoo would be more likely to say yes to a date and to have sex on that date.

Young has a hard time judging anyone by what tattoo they want and where they have it in.  Having a number of tattoos herself, she says she never actually chose the spots for the body art.  However, Young does notice a lot of young girls tend to go along with the latest 'fads.'

"The long novel of stuff under the bra line going down their ribs, or the infinity symbol with 'love' written in it or names...I would say under the bra line is the most tattooed spot for girls wanting to get tattooed.  I think just because it looks flirty and cute, and you can be discreet.," Young said.

Girls and women tend to go for a more-discreet tattoo, while Young finds men want something more visible.

Young is inking a lot of video game characters.  Girls will get flowers, gypsy ladies and buddhas, while men seem to be going back to a lot of Americana and tribal style.

"I notice a lot more people coming into the shop now and getting more traditional, tribal stuff, not like in the 90's but the Mayan stuff.  That's making a big comeback.  Also the sailor tattoos that were big in the 50's are getting bigger now."

A lot of the artists in the shop also tend to do cover-ups.  Young spoke specifically about the 'tramp stamps' being turned into back pieces.

"I think tattoos now are more timeless because there was only so much (to draw on).  People have the Internet now so they can (find stuff they really like)...I think more people are bringing it to a more personal level."